QOTD: Martin Luther on the Original Languages

Without the original languages we could not have received the gospel.

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QOTD: Greek Has No Concern with German or English - AT Robertson

Concerning the article in Greek

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QOTD: The Adequacy of Language (Silva)

Have you ever heard that Greek is a superior language because its complexities?

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Book Notice: The Greek Article by Ronald Peters

A new book published by Brill on the Greek article looks to be helpful. The description on Brill’s website says:

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QOTD: Steve Runge on the Need for Preachers and Teachers to Learn the Original Languages

Steve Runge on the need for preachers and teachers to learn the original languages:

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Daily Greek Reading Setup

In order to master any language you need daily exposure to it. Many seminary students quickly lose their languages because they do not continue reading Greek after their 1–2 years in class. Only spending a couple semesters in a language is not enough to learn a language, let alone master it.

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Greek Reading List

I have been trying to do more Greek reading of late and I came across this list over at the Dunelm Road blog. The list is by Daniel Wallace and was originally posted by Ben Blackwell[1] here.. The order of the list is supposed to go form easiest to hardest while being grouped in about 10 chapter increments.

Theoretically one could read the whole New Testament in a month but for my studies right now that seems a little too ambitious. I do think I will try to start with a chapter a day and increase over time.

I find it best to use the Zondervan Greek Reader for when I am just reading Greek. I find by using the reader it forces me to think through words I should know but have forgotten. For example, if you come across a word that occurs more than 30x it will not be listed in the footnotes. If I were not using a reader I would have a much quicker trigger looking up a word that I already know. I prefer this reader over UBS Greek NT Reader’s Edition for a couple reasons:

  1. No parsing. I find this to be an advantage because it forces me to work on my parsing on vocabulary I do not know. In the UBS reader it parses both difficult words and every word that occurs 30x or less.
  2. Size. The Zondervan reader is roughly over half the size of the UBS Reader, which makes it much easier to carry around from place to place.

If anyone is interested in forming a Greek reading plan with me just contact me via twitter (@renshaw330) or email ([email protected]). This would mostly be for accountability purposes because it is so easy to stray from reading the original languages daily.

Here is the list:

  1. John 1–11
  2. John 12–21
  3. 1 John; 2 John; 3 John; Philemon
  4. Mark 1–8
  5. Mark 9–16
  6. Matthew 1–10
  7. Matthew 11–20
  8. Matthew 21–28
  9. Revelation 1–11
  10. Revelation 12–22
  11. 1 Thessalonians; 2 Thessalonians
  12. Ephesians; Colossians
  13. Philippians; Romans 1–8
  14. Romans 9–16
  15. 1 Corinthians 1–10
  16. 1 Corinthians 11–16
  17. Galatians; James
  18. 1 Peter; 1 Timothy
  19. 2 Timothy; Titus
  20. Jude; 2 Peter
  21. 2 Corinthians 1–7
  22. 2 Corinthians 8–13
  23. Luke 1–8
  24. Luke 9–16
  25. Luke 17–24
  26. Acts 1–10
  27. Acts 11–19
  28. Acts 20–28
  29. Hebrews 1–7
  30. Hebrews 8–13

Download the PDF of the list here.

Tavis Bohlinger has several good posts on practicing greek like a violin player. You can find his introductory post here.


  1. You can follow him on twitter at @bencblackwell  ↩

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, ben blackwell, tavis bohlinger, daniel wallace, reading list, zondervan
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